BMW Berlin-Marathon 2018

© © Alexander Hassenstein

Short review

BMW Berlin-Marathon is an annual running and sports event, one of the Abbott World Marathon Majors. Initiated in 1974, the event traditionally takes place on the last weekend in September.

The Berlin Marathon is a home for many world records. Paul Tergat was the first man to cross the Brandenburg Gate – the symbol for reunification when he ran a world record of 2:04:55 in 1990. In 2007 and 2008 Haile Gebrselassie broke that record, first lowering it to 2:04:26 and then to 2:03:59. In 2011, Patrick Makau reclaimed the record for Kenya, finishing in 2:03:38.

The most recent world record was also set at Berlin Marathon. Dennis Kimetto ran a barrier-breaking 2:02:57 in 2014.

This event is a great combination of sporting and fun. Throughout the course, runners enjoy live music of different genres, visitors can attend drawing competitions and kids can run special distances of 400-1000 meters. There is also a race for skaters.

4 reasons to go
  • Major event
  • Exceptionally well-organized
  • Different types of races
  • Takes place in the capital city
2 reasons not to go
  • High entry fee
  • Crowded area
Registration closed

Road Running , Kids' Run

Distance:

Marathon

Price:

from $128

Type of Surface:

asphalt

Type of Terrain:

city

Major

Charity

Wheelchair

Organized since 1974

Short review

BMW Berlin-Marathon is an annual running and sports event, one of the Abbott World Marathon Majors. Initiated in 1974, the event traditionally takes place on the last weekend in September.

The Berlin Marathon is a home for many world records. Paul Tergat was the first man to cross the Brandenburg Gate – the symbol for reunification when he ran a world record of 2:04:55 in 1990. In 2007 and 2008 Haile Gebrselassie broke that record, first lowering it to 2:04:26 and then to 2:03:59. In 2011, Patrick Makau reclaimed the record for Kenya, finishing in 2:03:38.

The most recent world record was also set at Berlin Marathon. Dennis Kimetto ran a barrier-breaking 2:02:57 in 2014.

This event is a great combination of sporting and fun. Throughout the course, runners enjoy live music of different genres, visitors can attend drawing competitions and kids can run special distances of 400-1000 meters. There is also a race for skaters.

4 reasons to go
  • Major event
  • Exceptionally well-organized
  • Different types of races
  • Takes place in the capital city
2 reasons not to go
  • High entry fee
  • Crowded area

1 Road Running races on 16 September 2018 in Berlin

Berlin Marathon

42.195 km

401 m

from $128

39000 runners

usually take part in the race

42.195 km run course map

42.195 km

Weather for Sep 16, 2018

63.48 °F

Wind: 6.59 m/s.

Partly cloudy throughout the day..

Very Good for running

Powered by Dark Sky

What to wear on your run?

Contacts of the organizers & official website

Hanns-Braun-Straße/Adlerplatz, 14053 Berlin
Phone: 030 - 30 12 88 10, fax: 030 - 30 12 88 20

We recommend checking the official website for up-to-date information.

The information about BMW Berlin-Marathon is based on information provided by the organizers or found on the official website of the event.

If you have noticed any mistake, please let us know at

[email protected]

Best reviews

user avatar
Mital P. from yelp.com

Skater's review

What a fantastic event this is!
One of the grand slam running marathons, very well organised but for me a little bit more special because I am not a runner! I am an inline skater and the Berlin Marathon is the biggest skating marathon in the world.
Super smooth roads, flat surfaces, crowds coming out to support everyone and a wonderful atmosphere!
It's probably the best way to see Berlin! Skating around the city, taking photos as you go and getting a medal for it at the end!
user avatar
Jackie S. from yelp.com

Jackie S. from yelp.com

I highly recommend the Berlin Marathon. As one of the World's Major Marathons, the Berlin Marathon doesn't disappoint with the course, spectators, and more!

Course: Mostly flat course with some occasional rolling hills (not steep though). We traveled through the main areas of Berlin. It was great to see the number of spectators along the course. The course was slightly congested as there were around 35,000 runners along the course.

Communication: Plenty of email communications. There were also updates via Facebook, so we didn't have any issues and/or questions on arrival.

Expo: The... Show full review
3-day expo was held at the former Tempelhof Airport, and was spread out over 4 sections. I would recommend getting to the expo early for less congestion. You pick up your bib, finisher's t-shirt (either pre-purchased or you can purchase in the store), and timing chip (if rented). There were plenty of vendors to purchase shoes, shirts, and/or last minute running items.

Water Station: Every 3km so we were not dehydrated. The stations also had fruit, tea, and energy drinks.

Amenities: After the race, you receive your medal and a bag of fruits and snacks.

Breakfast Run: I would recommend that you do the free Breakfast Run, courtesy of the Berlin Marathon. It was a 6km run that started at the Charlottenburg Castle and ended at the Olympic Stadium. It was a fun run to loosen the muscles. At the end of the run, runners received a breakfast of water, chocolate drink, Berliner, raisin bread, and fruit.

Unfortunately, 2013 was the last year of first come, first served registration. Starting in 2014, the Berlin Marathon went to the route of a lottery due to the high demand of registration.
user avatar
Jeannine Avelino from bibrave.com

Jeannine Avelino from bibrave.com

Organization – The Germans are very organized and it shows. It’s easy to figure out where to get what you need. Communication was great and lots of information was available online and at package pickup (they handed out information booklets and transit maps). All my questions were answered quickly just by looking online or reading the booklet. The race started promptly and there were lots of signs and volunteers showing you where to go. They also gave advice on which station to get off at since there are road closures all over the place.

Package Pickup & Expo – I went on the first day right... Show full review
right when it opened and it was a breeze; although, I heard that things get quite hectic closer to race day. While it was a large venue, everything is organized and easy to find and within 10 minutes, I got my package. What I didn’t like was that once you left package pickup, you can’t go back in. The Expo conveniently located by the Gleisdreieck U-Bahn station. It was large and you can take up a lot of time just walking and seeing everything. The Adidas shop is massive and they had separate lines for people buying official merchandise and those buying regular stuff. I don’t know why but I’m sure there was a reason. We bought official and non-official stuff separately and there wasn’t much of a lineup due to the number of cashiers. There’s food outside if you get hungry as well (bring cash).

Course – The course is fast and flat as advertised. You run through a bunch of neighbourhoods, cross the winding Spree River 6 or 7 times, and see some iconic landmarks. The best part was running through the Brandenburg Gate, a nice welcome to the finish line. Aid stations were plentiful and well-stocked. There was also a Red Bull station at about 6 km to go which was helpful. They did use plastic cups for water but paper cups for energy drink. I think they could’ve used paper for both, I don’t know why. It made a bit of a mess. All the volunteers were friendly and happy to help you out. There were even massage stations in the second half of the course!

Swag – I don’t like that you had to pay for finisher shirts but I like that they gave you a choice to even get a shirt or not. I personally bought the shirts but I know some people would rather not have it. I guess I could count the Breakfast Run as swag… it was a free event with free food. That, I appreciated, as it was a fantastic shakeout run. The medal is beautiful and the post-race snack bag I got had a lot of stuff in it. Again, I wish I bought the shoes.

Would I Do it Again? In a heartbeat. I know I could do better if I wasn’t feeling like crap. Plus, I love Berlin.

Video about running race